Basic abbreviations & a small guide to RP.

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likakins

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Amelie Stryver
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#1
Greetings!

Here's a list of general roleplay abbreviations.

Role-playing game:

A role-playing game (RPG; often roleplaying game) is a game in which the participants assume the roles of fictional characters. Participants determine the actions of their characters based on their characterization, and the actions succeed or fail according to a formal system of rules and guidelines. Within the rules, players have the freedom to improvise; their choices shape the direction and outcome of the game.

In character & out of character (often abbreviated IC & OOC):

A role-playing game (RPG; often roleplaying game) is a game in which the participants assume the roles of fictional characters. Participants determine the actions of their characters based on their characterization, and the actions succeed or fail according to a formal system of rules and guidelines. Within the rules, players have the freedom to improvise; their choices shape the direction and outcome of the game.

This is the distinction between in character (IC) and out of character (OOC). Out of character information can not be used in character. The information you can gather as player is not the information your character has. There is a separation between your character's fictional world and the real player's world. For example; the name tags that float above a players names are not seen by your character. Thus if you use the information you gathered out of character (the seeing of the player's name tag) as information your character has, it is considered metagaming. A simple definition for this term would be: the mixing of OOC and IC or using OOC information in IC situations. This is not allowed on NGRP and is punishable with prison time.

Powergaming:

This is a wide concept term and it's literal definition is varied. The concept of this term that you perform an action which your character is incapable of. Examples of this are god-like abilities. It is commonly referred to when a player powergames with the /me command. Use of the command to perform an action your character would otherwise be incapable of is considered powergaming. For example; /me takes all your money or /me takes all your guns, are examples of powergaming. This is not allowed on NGRP and is punishable with prison time.
Deathmatching (often abbreviated DM):

Deathmatching is defined as the killing of another player without a valid IC reason. This could be due to an OOC conflict or a dispute between the players out of the game. The literal definition of death matching would be "a match till death". There are many DM servers on SA:MP in which you can do it without any punishments but on NGRP you are not to kill another player unless there is a valid IC reason to do so. This is not allowed on NGRP and is punishable.

Revenge killing (often abbreviated RK):

Revenge killing is killing somebody after they have killed you. This is not possible due to the fact that you lose 30 minutes of your memory once you have been killed -- thus you do not remember who killed you or even the fact that you were killed. The rules are still slightly vague on this and do not literally tell you whether a death is to be ignored or considered an injury (once a cop kills you it considered an injury apparently). If you think about it, your character would not be able to revenge his own death thus this is not allowed on NGRP and is punishable.Revenge killing is killing somebody after they have killed you. This is not possible due to the fact that you lose 30 minutes of your memory once you have been killed -- thus you do not remember who killed you or even the fact that you were killed. The rules are still slightly vague on this and do not literally tell you whether a death is to be ignored or considered an injury (once a cop kills you it considered an injury apparently). If you think about it, your character would not be able to revenge his own death thus this is not allowed on NGRP and is punishable.

Killing on sight (often abbreviated KoS):

The deathmatching definition for most servers - separate term in this server, it stands for attacking or killing someone with no or minimal roleplay involved, or without interacting with the person beforehand and attaining a reason in that conversation etc. Just because you see your enemy on the horizon doesn't mean you should instantly kill the person, unless there's a really good justification - such as you and your gang mates claiming a turf, then you notice armed gang members tagged with a hostile gang's colors - in that case interaction is not required as it's obvious that the other side is not here to negotiate etc.
Logging to avoid:

Logging to avoid is logging off the game to avoid something -- this can be logging to avoid death, arrest, prison etc.

Quickswapping (often abbreviated QS):

Quickswapping is quickly swapping to another weapon or your fists and then back to the weapon you were originally shooting with to avoid the reload animation. This is not allowed and is punishable.

Crackshooting (often abbreviated CS):

Crackshooting is often done with a Desert Eagle to shoot at a faster rate but can also be done with other weapons. It is done by something which is called "c-bugging" which is crouch bugging.

C-sliding:

Also known as "crouch sliding". It is a gun discharge exploit that allows you to glitch your character into sliding around while shooting your gun.

Driver drive-by (often abbreviated DDB ):

Driver drive-by is performing a drive-by with for example an MP5 to kill somebody (sometimes called drivershooting).

Car ramming:

Car ramming is intentionally ramming your vehicle into somebody to make them lose HP/armor or intentionally ramming your vehicle into another vehicle to make the car lose HP.

Car parking:

Carparking is placing your vehicle on top of somebody in an attempt to kill them.

Car- and planebombing:

Intentionally attempting to kill somebody with an exploding car or plane.

Air brake:

Air braking is a hack function found in many hacking modifications of GTA: SA. It basically allows the player to fly and move incredibly fast.

Money farming:

Money farming is making multiple accounts and transferring the money to one account.

Paycheck farming:

Sometimes called the time/money exploit. Paycheck farming is gathering paychecks in able to gather respect points and money without actually playing. This is done with the running man bug or with binds which causes their character to move with intervals in order to avoid the AFK kicker in the script.

Alt Tabbed in Public:

Alt Tabbed in Public, being AFK (alt-tabbed, or just having the pause menu up) in a public place, such as the middle of a road, Ganton GYM etc. Normally players are kicked for ATIP if them being in that spot is disturbing roleplay, obstructing the movement of vehicles or players etc.

Non-RP Behavior:

This is a general term for doing anything completely unrealistic or non-roleplay. It's hard to define it, as a lot of unrealistic actions are being committed on the server that aren't punishable.

Character Kill (often abbreviated CK):

Character Kill, permanently killing someone's character, involves a player to roleplay killing their character. If a player wants a CK, they will be forced to change their name and fined 50% of their total wealth. A CK cannot be forced upon a player, the player must agree to the CK and request the CK before it is done.

Player Kill (often abbreviated PK):

Player Kill, standart death that happens when a player is killed OOCly (lowered to 0 HP, then /accept death or just died while in critically wounded state). Upon a PK, character loses memory of the events that happend in the past 30 minutes, including the events regarding the killer(-s) killing the character.

and last but not least, [ ] (( )) and {{ }} brackets are sometimes used in forum, chat and MMORPG role-playing as to designate OOC info.​



I. Defining a Roleplay Game:


A roleplaying game is a game in which the participants assume the roles of fictional characters and collaboratively create stories. Participants determine the actions of their characters based on their given personalities, and the actions succeed or fail according to a formal or informal system of rules and guidelines. Within these regulations, roleplayers may improvise freely; their choices shape the direction and outcome of the game. As to better relate to the overall concept, a short Roleplay Lexicon has been provided below (you will often find these used in RP discussions/live RP):

Lexicon:

Backstory: The background story/history of a game world and the characters, places and items in it. Also used for a player’s character history and lore.

Bluewalling or RP Bluewalling: Borrowed from the player vs player (PvP) term for a non-combat player attacking a player who is in PvP combat mode. In RP terms, it is used when a role-player attempts to role-play with another role-player at random.

Character Description: How your character or a NPC would be described if seen for the first time.

Free-form RP: As the name implies, role-playing that is more or less free-form, unscripted and open-ended.

IC/OOC: Short for “In Character”, for when the player is playing his role. Short for "Out of Character", for when the player isn't playing his role.

ICly/OOCly: Short for “while in character”. Short for "while out of character."

Immersion: Suppression of OOC activities for a more immersive RP experience. Though not fully attainable, the more immersion, the more you can focus ICly on your character. The “holy grail” of role-playing.

Mary Sue, Gary Stu: Idealistic characters, capable of doing almost anything and with little or no consequences. These characters know everything and can literally do no wrong. They are, in a sense, perfect. Godmoding is also not very far behind. Also looked down upon in general role-playing. Also found in may fiction books, movies and the like.

Metagaming: Using OOC information or game mechanics to influence your IC roleplay, or using OOC information or game mechanics against another player. An example would be knowing a persons name by reading the bracket above their character.

Scripted RP: “Set” interactions within roleplaying. In story-lines, these are somewhat to be expected.

Story Arcs: A series of story-lines and plot devices/series of adventures over a period of time.

II. How to construct your emotes and use clean writing:

The one pet peeve shared by most roleplayers is related to proper grammar/punctuation (or the lack of it). To go beyond it, word repetition is a close second in terms of reading taxation. You could very well be the next Hemingway or Dickens, yet if your partner requires 10 minutes to decipher a two-line emote because of errors, both your roleplay experience and his will inadvertently be diminished.


Typing Errors and how to solve them:

Re-read your emote in-game before releasing in into the wild.
Type your emote in a pad (word/anything similar) and copy/paste it in-game. This is particularly useful as it gives you a complete view of your emote, rather than the chat box's one-line setup. This is also the option I'm fonder of, and which I still resort to if roleplaying when very tired/unable to focus.


Examples of Typing Errors:
"John went to the shop to get some food. Arriving there, he realized he forgot his wallet and went back home."

"John wnet to teh shop to get some food. Ariving ther he realized he forgot his walet and went back hme!?"


The first error free line provides no strain to reading, ensuring roleplay flows as it should. The second, not so much. It is to be noted that constant typos/lack of proper punctuation will also irk certain roleplayers into unfairly tagging you as a poor writer.


Word repetition and how to solve it:

Avoiding word repetition is also key in giving your writing a slick feel. Most people struggle with word repetition due to not, as of yet, having a strong grasp on English vocabulary. Solving the aforementioned is achieved by:

Reading articles/books/materials in English
Using of a synonym dictionary (example: ~ dico.isc.cnrs.fr/dico/en/search ~)
Rephrasing sentences and word omittance


Using a synonym dictionary


A very important aspect of using a dictionary is knowing when and what words to change. While a synonym will mostly serve to convey the same meaning of its parent word, some synonyms actually stray away from the initial definition and can slightly alter the meaning of your sentence.

Examples of wrong synonym use:

"Jon began to slowly move for his target." - This shows that Jon is slowly pacing towards his target.

"Jon began to sluggishly move for his target." - By using "sluggish" as opposed to "slow", the sentence can still retain its meaning. Withal, "sluggish" also means to lack energy and alertness, and your partner can interpret it as such, potentially misunderstanding your intention.

Examples of synonym over-usage:


"They are warm, nice people, with big hearts." - This format conveys a simple sentence with a clear point. The writing itself also has a humane touch/feel, to which other people can easily relate.

"They are humid, prepossessing homo-sapiens with full-sized aortic pumps." - This format not only confuses through the writing style, yet also makes the sentence difficult to understand. The writing also has a very artificial feel to it.


Rephrasing sentences & word omittance:

One of the best ways through which you can avoid repetition in writing is removing a word or rephrasing the sentence's structure.

Examples of rephrasing & word omittance:

"Michael hit his hand by mistake. His hand was now bruised, and it hurt. He called the Doctor telling him his hand hurt, and the Doctor told him his hand could use a bit of ice. Michael said he'll put some ice on his hand."

"Michael hit his hand by mistake. It was now bruised and clearly hurting. He called the Doctor telling him of his injury, and the Doctor told him his hand could use a bit of ice. Michael said he'll put some ice on it.


BONUS - Purple Prose:

In literary criticism, purple prose is defined as a text that is so extravagant, ornate, or flowery that it breaks the flow and draws excessive attention to itself. Purple prose is characterized by the extensive use of adjectives, adverbs, zombie nouns, and metaphors. In short, it means turning a simple action into something a lot more complicated than it should be. In example:


Purple prose examples:

"David shrugged, a short tilt of his head sending his hair from one shoulder to the next."

"David shrugged, a short tilt of his head having his lion-like mane swaying akin a tide, emerald locks refracting each glimmer the sun sent their way whilst seemingly gaining life when creeping from one muscular shoulder to the next. The movement was divine, the mere sight of it inspiring tranquility in all those witnessing his glorious hair in action."


Now, you may think the second line is "OH MY GOD YOUR DESCRIPTIVE WRITING ABILITY IS GOD-LIKE", yet it isn't. It neither makes writing look 'cool', nor is it a testament to anything else aside knowing how to put together a long sentence. That is not to say certain actions/activities/scenarios (especially in 1on1s) shouldn't have more detail added to them. The main key point is moderation: keep a maximum of two adjectives per action (action =/= sequence) performed, as to not detract from the main point of your emote (which is showing what your character is doing).

lll. Defining and limiting your character:

A well defined character backstory is crucially important in role-playing. Not only does it gives your character depth, but it also makes for a more well-rounded experience. Character development in a backstory forms a “blueprint” of your character’s past, present and future. The easiest way to create a history for your character is coming up with an answer to the following questions:

The Past:
1. Where was your character born and raised?
2. Who were your family or guardians? Siblings?
3. How did your “family” and upbringing influence your character’s childhood?
4. What had your character learned through education and childhood?
5. What major events and/or people growing up helped shape your character?
6. What has your character done since growing up?


Recent Past/Present:
1. What has your character done recently prior to being “active” in the game?
2. What does your character actually “do” for a living?
3. How would your character explain it to a stranger if he/she had to?
4. What is your character’s present mental/emotional/physical state?
5. What is your character’s world view, beliefs and/or mindset?
6. What is your character’s morals or values?
7. What are your character’s quirks, merits, flaws and/or character traits?
8. What are your character’s likes/loves and dislikes/hates?
9. What does your character do well? Doesn’t do well?
10. What does your character do when “off the clock”?
11. How does your character speak (dialects, accents, etc.) to others?
12. Does your character use certain expressions or words, if any?


The Future:
1. What are your character’s short term goals?
2. What are your character’s long term goals?
3. What motivates or drives your character?
4. How “social” will your character be when interacting with others, if at all?
5. How would you like your character to be remembered? Does it matter?


It is not advisable that you come up with answers for all of the above questions during character creation. Roleplay is meant to influence the growth of your character, which in turn will provide ends to some of the queries above. Proper character development will also serve to change the answers to some of the topics mentioned based on how IC interaction gives your character depth. A well rounded character will, eventually, have at least 80% of the above queries answered through his own development or growth via roleplay.


Backstory Tips:

Use lore to help you with research and details.

If your game offers different races and/or nationalities, find out more about them. Doing so helps with fleshing out your character’s details.

For most games, keep your “brushes with fame” at a minimum. Being the relative, friend, antagonist or love child of a main character, or otherwise being in close contact with major storyline character tends to be looked down upon.

Don’t go overboard, keep it simple. It’s like using spices: sometimes a dash is better than a handful.

Everything won't always mesh. That’s normal, so don’t feel discouraged.

If you don’t know something that might be crucial, start digging and ask reliable sources or people to fill in the blanks.

If you think your character’s backstory is odd, re-check your lore or get a second opinion. If it still sounds odd, it needs more work.

I hope this was somewhat helpful. :Kappa: :KappaRoss:
 

Codac

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#4
Blatant copy from other servers. If you want to make a guide, please make sure it's original content and not stolen from anywhere else.
 
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